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Making Arithmetic Procedures Make Sense

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Thursday January 30th, 2020
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Christopher Woodin has developed innovative, research-based methods for teaching about numbers and learning basic math skills. His methods mitigate language demands through whole-to-part, multimodal strategies that help students express, relate, store, and retrieve information efficiently.
 
Graphic organizers are powerful math teaching tools that can support students’ working memory, executive function, or language-based processes. The best diagrams provide a way to see component parts within the organized context of a whole fact or process. Prompts to toggle focus between these elements directs the proper sequence of perception and expression. A variety of whole-to-part graphic organizers will be presented that model the concepts, procedures and word problems relating to whole numbers and fractions. 

Meet the Presenter

Christopher Woodin, Ed.M., is a specialist in the fields of mathematics and learning disabilities. He has been with Landmark School since 1986 where he holds the Ammerman Chair of Mathematics and is Chair of the Math Department. He is a graduate of Middlebury College and the Harvard Graduate School of Education. Chris has published several articles, including a recent one through the Yale Center for Dyslexia and Creativity. His latest book is entitled Multiplication and Division Facts for the Whole-to-Part Visual Learner, and he is currently developing a computer-based numeracy program with Nessy Learning in the UK. Chris was the 1997 Massachusetts Learning Disabilities Association (LDA) Samuel Kirk Educator of the Year, and he served on the Massachusetts Department of Education’s Mathematics 2011 Curriculum Frameworks Panel. He presents internationally on topics involving multimodal math instruction and learning disabilities.

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